Building on a “Wellness” Model

Many behavioral models focus on what is wrong with a person to identify “personality disorders.” The DISC model is based on normal behavior, not abnormal behavior. DISC is a “wellness model” that is objective and descriptive rather than subjective and judgmental.

Therefore, DISC is a practical way to understand yourself and those around in the common settings of everyday life. 

A Positive Approach

The DISC wellness model is a good framework for understanding people. DISC should be used in a positive way to encourage a person to be his or her best – not as a way to “label” someone.

Healthy, positive relationships come from having an accurate understanding of yourself and others. DISC is a powerful tool for obtaining a new appreciation for our personality styles and their effect on our everyday lives.

We apply the DISC model with four main ideas that allow it to be used appropriately as an effective and encouraging tool:

  • We use a POSITIVE approach to highlight and encourage a person in his or her STRENGTHS.
  • We use a POSITIVE approach to address a person’s possible BLIND-SPOTS without assuming a weakness exists.
  • We recognize that each person has a unique blend of ALL the major personality traits to a greater or lesser extent.
  • We recognize that behavioral patterns are fluid and dynamic as a person adapts to his or her environment.

I have a saying that, “your strengths should carry you while your blind-spots should concern you.” Being able to identify and articulate your strengths can be very empowering. Being able to identify and uncover blind-spots can also be very empowering! The next few pages can be the start of your own empowering discovery process.

So, now that you know where the DISC concept came from and the importance of having a positive, flexible approach, let’s take a look at the Model of Human Behavior using the DISC!

The DISC Model of Human Behavior

The DISC Model of Human Behavior is based on 2 foundational observations about how people normally behave:

Observation #1: Some people are more OUTGOING, while others are more RESERVED.

You can think of this trait as each person’s “internal motor” or “pace.” Some people always seem ready to “go” and “dive in” quickly. They engage their motor quickly. Others tend to engage their motor more slowly or more cautiously.

Observation # 2: Some people are more TASK-ORIENTED, while others are more PEOPLE-ORIENTED.

You can think of this as each person’s “external focus” or “priority” that guides them. Some people are focused on getting things done (tasks); others are more tuned-in to the people around them and their feelings.

With both observations, we want to emphasize that these behavioral tendencies are neither right or wrong or good or bad. They are just different. We are simply identifying normal behavior styles. People have different styles, and that is okay. We represent these 2 observations in the diagrams below.

Four Major Personality Traits

In review, we have 4 behavioral tendencies to help us characterize people:

  • Outgoing
  • Reserved
  • Task-oriented
  • People-oriented

 

——Next Part 3